35 for 35 book descriptions

Ages 0-2

  • “Cat’s First Baby” written and illustrated by Natalie Nelson
    I am a cat. Are you a cat? 
    There’s a new addition to the family, but who exactly is this small being? This new arrival doesn’t meow like a cat, or smell like a cat, or even have a tail like a cat. In Cat’s First Baby, the feline companion to “Dog’s First Baby,” Natalie Nelson captures the wonder and humor of a new family member through a cat’s eyes. Sure to delight kids and cat parents alike, this board book promises to be a repeat read-aloud. 
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  • “Dog’s First Baby” written and illustrated by Natalie Nelson
    I am a dog. Are you a dog? 
    Welcoming a new baby to the family isn’t always easy. When his humans bring home someone new, Dog is determined to sniff out the truth. Is this arrival another dog … or something else? With Dog’s First Baby, Natalie Nelson captures the wonder and humor of a new baby through a dog’s eyes.  
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  • “Hello, Beautiful You!” written by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney
    With bouncing, rhythmic text from New York Times bestselling author Andrea Davis Pinkney and tender, charming illustrations from Caldecott Honor and Coretta Scott King Award-winning illustrator Brian Pinkney, this board book is part of the Bright Brown Baby series, a celebration of Black and brown joy. 
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  • “I Love Your Face!” written by Karma Wilson, illustrated by AG Ford
    From New York Times bestselling duo Karma Wilson and AG Ford comes this sweet, read-aloud picture book that celebrates how utterly irresistible our little ones are and how much we adore those beautiful facesLively, bouncy rhymes celebrate all the faces babies make. 
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Ages 2+

  • “Awake, Asleep” written by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Nadia Alam
    From sunup to sundown, a young child’s day is bursting with discovery and wonder. Showcasing a diverse range of kids, and families that include same-sex parents, single parents, and multigenerational households, “Awake, Asleep” reflects our world with beauty and joy, rendering the simple moments in a young child’s day as transformative, wonder-filled memories. Perfect for bedtime cuddles and cozy storytime all day long, this book is soothing and familiar. 
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  • “Bus Stop” written by Angela H. Dale, illustrated by Lala Watkins
    It’s time for school, and all the neighborhood kids, from Antoine to Mahmoud to Zoey, gather one by one in the frosty dawn to wait for the school bus. But something more thrilling arrives first. Snowflakes fall, transforming the bus stop into a winter wonderland — and an official snow day. No school! Simple, snowy fun with a vocabulary-building boost. 
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  • “Dream Big” written and illustrated by Joyce Wan
    Told in simple, hopeful text, Joyce Wan’s bold, inspiring message features illustrations of 15 diverse female trailblazers and icons throughout history. This board book will empower little ones to find the courage and strength to pursue and achieve their own dreams!
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  • “Sometimes I Kaploom” written by Rachel Vail, illustrated by Hyewon Yum
    Katie Honors is a really brave kid. But sometimes she refuses to let go of her mom, and everything is flurried as she begins to cry. Her emotions feel frightening. But her mother assures Katie that she can be both brave and sad, brave and crying, brave and scared. This picture book masterfully explores how hard it can be for children when they’re nervous or scared and must transition to new places and faces when they just don’t feel quite ready. A poignant, honest, and insightful story, readers learn alongside Katie that bravery and fear are not mutually exclusive. Comfort for both children and parents in an all-too-familiar situation.
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  • “The Rice in the Pot Goes Round and Round” written by Wendy Wan-Long Shang, illustrated by Lorian Tu
    Modeled after “The Wheels on the Bus,” readers of all ages are sure to delight in this joyful, expressive singalong to a familiar tune. A young Chinese family enjoys a visit to their grandparents’ house where the dinner table is stacked with bamboo steamers and numerous dishes, with a lazy susan in the center. As the story progresses, each family member is addressed in Chinese and associated with a traditional dish. Rhythmic text and vibrant, playful illustrations bring this heartwarming, expression of family love to life.
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  • “This Is Our House” written and illustrated by Hyewon Yum
    Hyewon Yum’s picture book is a warm story that follows a family through seasons and generations, from the early days of immigration to the times that made their house a home. A young girl leads readers through the life of a simple house, and, in photo-album style, describes the memories her family made there through three generations. Grandma and Grandpa arrived at the house from a country far away. Mom and her brothers played on the steps on warm summer days. And the little girl learned to walk right there in front of the same house. A story of place and belonging.
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  • “We All Play” written and illustrated by Julie Flett
    Animals and kids love to play! This wonderful book celebrates playtime and the connection between children and the natural world. At the end of the book, animals and children gently fall asleep after a fun day of playing outside, making this book a great bedtime story. A beautiful ode to the animals and humans who share our world, this celebration of nature is sprinkled with words from the Cree language. A closing glossary provides both Cree and English names for the animals; a note provides guidance on Cree pronunciation for readers not familiar with the language.
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  • “You Matter” written and illustrated by Christian Robinson
    In this full, bright, beautiful picture book of self-love, young readers will be drawn into the luminous illustrations of a diverse cast of characters. This appealing picture book invites readers to engage with the world in a new way and see how everyone is connected, everyone matters, and that every living entity has value, no matter how small!
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Ages 3+

  • “Bathe The Cat” written by Alice B. McGinty, illustrated by David Roberts
    It’s cleaning day, but who will bathe the cat? The family pet turns a day of housework into riotous story-time in this fun read-aloud that will incite giggles and laughter as the mischievous cat scrambles the to-do chores list. Instead of mopping the floor or feeding the fish, the family is soon busy rocking the rug, vacuuming the lawn, and sweeping the dishes. Illustrations depict same-sex parents in a multiracial family all pulling together — but will the house get cleaned before Grandma comes to visit? 
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  • “Carina Felina” written by Carmen Agra Deedy, illustrated by Henry Cole
    The trouble started when Pepe the parrot fell in love with … a CAT! Hoping to win her paw, he invited her to his house for dinner. But within moments of arriving — with a gobble and a gulp — Carina swallowed that love-sick parrot whole! And he was just the appetizer! The selfish blue cat, whom readers will love to hate, swallows anyone who questions her behavior. Colorful illustrations stimulate the imagination without overwhelming and include characteristics of a Hispanic Caribbean town in this Cuban-inflected retelling of a classic folktale.
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  • “Dreamers” written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales
    We are resilience. We are hope. We are dreamers. This is a story of finding your way in a new place, of navigating an unfamiliar world and finding the best parts of it. The lovingly illustrated picture book looks at the myriad of gifts that migrants bring with them when they leave their homes. It’s a story about family and reminds us that we are all dreamers, carrying our own strengths wherever we roam. Based on author Yuyi Morales own experience of leaving Mexico and coming to the United States with her infant son.
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  • “Drum Dream Girl” written by Margarita Engle, illustrated by Rafael Lopez
    Originally a poem, this is a beautiful account of a young girl’s bravery and her important contributions toward gender equality in the creative arts. Long ago on an island filled with music and rhythm, no one questioned the rule that Girls cannot be drummers — until the Drum Dream Girl. She longed to play tall congas and small bongós and silvery, moon-bright timbales. She had to practice in secret. But when her music was heard at last, everyone sang and danced and decided that boys and girls should be free to drum and dream. Inspired by a Chinese-African-Cuban girl who broke Cuba’s traditional taboo against female drummers, “Drum Dream Girl” tells an inspiring true story for dreamers everywhere.
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  • “My Moms Love Me” written by Anna Membrino, illustrated by Joy Hwang Ruiz
    Two mommies share a perfect day with their little one in this joyful picture book! From visiting animals on a farm and sharing a car ride singalong to a sudsy bath and bedtime snuggles galore, love and warmth beam out of every page. Read-aloud enthusiasts will quickly warm up to this sweet picture book, and many readers will appreciate its affirming portrayal of an LGBTQ+ and interracial family. 
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  • “Our Favorite Day” written and illustrated by Joowon Oh
    This charming tale of a love between grandfather and granddaughter will resonate with many families. Every morning, Papa follows his normal routine. He drinks his tea, waters his plants, tidies up, and takes the bus into town. Papa enjoys his daily tasks, but there’s one day each week that is extra special: the day his grandchild comes to visit! They share a favorite lunch of dumplings, wash dishes, then create a butterfly kite, finishing with a floral flourish. A delightful picture book for multigenerational readers and youngsters to share together.
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  • “We Are Water Protectors” written by Carole Lindstrom, illustrated by Michaela Goade
    In this tribute to Native resilience, Indigenous author-and-illustrator team Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade invite readers to stand up for environmental justice. “We Are Water Protectors” issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm, inviting young readers everywhere to join the fight.  
    Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all. And when a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth and poison her people’s water, one young water protector takes a stand to defend Earth’s most sacred resource. 
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Ages 4+

  • “A Library” written by Nikki Giovanni, illustrated by Erin K. Robinson
    A love letter to libraries! In what other place can a child “sail their dreams” and “surf the rainbow” without ever leaving the room? This ode to libraries is a celebration for everyone who loves stories, from seasoned readers to those just learning to love words. It will have children and parents alike imagining where their library can take them. This inspiring read-aloud includes stunning illustrations and a note from Nikki Giovanni about the importance of libraries in her own childhood.
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  • “Between Words, A Friendship Tale” written and illustrated by Saki Tanaka
    Kai is used to following the seasons with Pa, from place to new place where people speak languages unfamiliar to his ears. When they finally settle in a valley full of pools, Kai tries to invite the other children to join in his play, but the strangeness of his words drives them away. Frustrated, he kicks his most treasured stone into one of the pools and, in his search for it, finds something even more valuable. Dive into a whimsical tale of unexpected friendship, told with compassion and warmth. With every brushstroke, Saki Tanaka paints a radiant world where bonds are formed beyond language barriers. A beautiful tale for shy friend-makers everywhere.
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  • “Elephant in the Dark” written by Mina Javaherbin, illustrated by Eugene Yelchin
    When villagers hear of a huge, mysterious creature that has come all the way from India, they steal into the dark barn to find out what it is. “It’s like a snake!” says one. “It’s like a tree trunk,” says another. “No, it’s like a fan!” argues the third. Who is right? Which of them knows the creature’s true shape? Iranian American author Mina Javaherbin recasts an anecdote from the Persian poet Rumi, itself based on a far older tale about perceiving parts of a truth rather than its whole. Young readers will delight in the villagers’ wildly differing descriptions of the curious beast that has come to town.
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  • “Eyes That Kiss in the Corners” written by Joanna Ho, illustrated by Dung Ho
    A young Chinese American girl notices that her eyes look different from her friends’. They have big, round eyes and long lashes. She begins to wish for eyes like theirs — until she realizes that her eyes are like her mother’s, Amah’s, and Mei Mei’s. They have eyes that kiss in the corners and glow like warm tea, crinkle into crescent moons, and are filled with stories of the past and hope for the future — they are beautiful. “Eyes that Kiss in the Corners” is a dazzling, lyrical ode to loving oneself. Its tender yet powerful words and Dung Ho’s vibrant illustrations inspire readers to recognize their own beauty and strength, igniting self-discovery and confidence. A breathtaking picture book.
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  • “Forever Home” written and illustrated by Henry Cole
    This wordless tale features a boy who wants a dog more than anything in the world and a lonely dog that roams the neighborhood, yearning for an owner. But the boy’s room is a mess! He needs to help more around the house before his parents will even consider a family pet. An exquisitely rendered, touching story of companionship and belonging.
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  • “I Promise” written by Lebron James, illustrated by Nina Mata
    NBA champion and superstar LeBron James pens a slam-dunk picture book inspired by his foundation’s I PROMISE program, which motivates children everywhere to always #StriveForGreatness. Just a kid from Akron, Ohio, who is dedicated to uplifting youth everywhere, LeBron knows the key to a better future is to excel in school, do your best, and keep your family close. “I Promise” is a lively and inspiring picture book that reminds us that tomorrow’s success starts with the promises we make to ourselves and our community today. 
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  • “Julián at the Wedding” written and illustrated by Jessica Love
    Julián and his abuela are going to a wedding. Better yet, Julián is in the wedding. Weddings have flowers and kissing and dancing and cake. And at this wedding, Julian meets a new friend named Marisol. It’s not long before Julián and Marisol set off for some magic and mischief of their own, and when things take an unexpected turn, the pair learns that everything is easier with a good friend by your side. A celebration of weddings and friendship and a subtle yet poignant reminder that gender, like love, is expansive.
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  • “Nell Plants a Tree” written by Anne Wynter, illustrated by Daniel Miyares
    This gorgeous picture book shows how one little girl’s careful tending of a pecan tree creates the living center of a loving, intergenerational Black family. Readers will delight in watching time go back and forth, connecting past and present through linked stories about the planting and multigenerational use of one tree. As Nell grows from a young mother to a grandmother, with the same white house in the background, the tree also grows and grows until it shelters several generations of Nell’s family. Inspired by the pecan trees of the creators’ own childhoods, Anne Wynter’s lyrical picture book, brought to life with breathtaking illustrations by Daniel Miyares, brims with wonder and love.
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  • “One Family” written by George Shannon, illustrated by Blanca Gomez
    Just how many things can “one” be? One box of crayons. One batch of cookies. One world. One family. This visually striking picture book sends the message that everyone counts. From veteran children’s author George Shannon and artist Blanca Gomez comes a playful, interactive book that shows how a family can be big or small and comprised of people of a range of genders and races. The tale depicts interracial families, men with their arms around each other, and a Sikh man wearing a turban. This inclusive spirit supports the culminating assertion that “One is one and everyone. One earth. One world. One family.”
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  • “Our Pool” written and illustrated by Lucy Ruth Cummins
    Today is a pool day in the city! The sun is shining, so what are you waiting for? Friends and family. Kids and grandparents. Big bodies and small bodies. Everybody is welcome at our pool! Get ready for swimming and splashing, zigzagging and dunking, and racing and laughing. The merriment, beauty, and comforting routines of a pool day are on full display in this celebration of an urban summer tradition.
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  • “Skater Cielo” written and illustrated by Rachel Katstaller
    Cielo loves to skateboard! But when she messes up on a new ramp, she’s embarrassed and afraid to fall again in front of so many people. With the help of some new friends, Cielo summons the courage to try again (and again and again) and learns that falling is not failing — true fierceness isn’t about landing the perfect trick, it’s about picking yourself back up when you don’t. Look out for the glossary that clarifies terms and language for skateboarding newcomers.
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  • “The Paperboy” written and illustrated by Dav Pilkey
    In the still before dawn, while the rest of the world is sleeping, a boy and his dog leave the comfort of their warm bed to deliver newspapers. As the boy pedals his bike through his community, along a route he knows by heart, his dog runs by his side, and both enjoy a world that, before sunrise, belongs only to them. The paperboy’s story celebrates the beauty found in silence and the peace that comes from being with a beloved friend.
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  • “We Are Here” written by Tami Charles, illustrated by Bryan Collier
    Lyrical, affirmational, and bursting with love, “We Are Here” is a poignant story about Black and brown heritage and community. Full of assurance, tenderness, and triumph, this much-anticipated follow-up to the New York Times bestselling “All Because You Matter” offers an equally inspirational and arresting ode to all the Black women and men who have made momentous contributions from the beginning of time. “We Are Here” celebrates readers with pride, joy, and love, reminding them of their roots, inviting them to imagine a future that shines ever brightly, and strengthening them for their triumphant days to come!
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  • “When Rubin Plays” written and illustrated by Gracey Zhang
    Rubin loves the beautiful sounds played by the orchestra. He wants to learn to play the violin and make his own music. But when Rubin plays, it doesn’t sound like he imagines it should. He goes into the forest to practice alone, and, despite his violin’s screeching, finds an unlikely audience that loves his unique style. 
    In an inspiring, lyrical picture book that deftly dives into the heart and mind of a child’s viewpoint and experience, Gracey Zhang offers confidence to everyone who longs to master something that can be difficult. “When Rubin Plays” shows that there is only one way to do something right — to do it your own special way.  
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  • “Why Am I Me?” written by Paige Britt, illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selena Aiko
    Have you ever wondered why you are you? Or who you would be if you were someone else? Someone taller, faster, smaller, smarter? Someone lighter, older, darker, bolder? This beautiful celebration of our humanity and diversity invites readers of all ages to imagine a world where there is no you or me, only us. “Why Am I Me?” is a captivating ode to wonder and helps foster a child’s sense of connection, compassion, and love.
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  • “Windows” written by Julia Denos, illustrated by EB Goodale
    Walking his dog at dusk, one boy catches glimpses of the lives around him in this lovely ode to autumn evenings, exploring your neighborhood, and coming home. Readers are invited to match their observant eyes with those of the child, who notes the windows and what the people or animals that can be seen within their frames are doing. They may be playing an instrument or dancing or painting. At the end of the walk, boy and dog pass a house with no lights on; its windows “leave you to fill them up with stories.” Finally, home beckons, and the child and mother curl up in a comfy chair for their own bedtime story.
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