News Archive

Infant‐directed communication: Examining the many dimensions of everyday caregiver‐infant interactions

The study investigated how caregivers communicate with their toddlers, combining various methods, like speech, gestures, and touch, during playtime. The sample consisted of 44 toddler-caregiver dyads from predominantly middle-class, English-speaking families in the U.S. Results showed that caregivers often used multiple communication methods together, adjusting their complexity based on the toddler’s responses and language skills. These findings suggest that these dyadic interactions are richer and more responsive than previously understood.

Read the complete study here.

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YouTube’s ABCs and 123s: Describing the quality of early literacy and math videos on YouTube

This study analyzed 1,198 YouTube videos on early literacy and math to assess the educational content available to young children on streaming platforms. Findings reveal that while these videos often use concrete examples, many lack direct engagement with viewers and character involvement, with the most directly interactive videos being less popular among users. This research adds important insights to the relatively understudied area of online educational media for children.

Read the complete research here.

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Physicians’ lifelong learning journeys: A narrative analysis of continuing professional development struggles

This study investigated physicians’ experiences with continuing professional development (CPD) after their formal education, highlighting the struggles they face in adapting to less structured learning environments and prioritizing patient care over personal educational growth. Physicians expressed feeling under-supported in this transition, resorting to ad-hoc learning strategies that may not align with formal CPD requirements, suggesting a need for systemic changes to enhance meaningful lifelong learning. The study’s findings hold important insights for ROR as it seeks to build out the Community of Clinicians.

Read the complete study here.

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Screen Time and Parent-Child Talk When Children Are Aged 12 to 36 Months

This Australian cohort study investigated the association between screen time and parent-child communication (adult words, child vocalizations, and conversational turns) in children aged 12 to 36 months, using data from 220 families. The findings revealed a negative correlation between screen time and parent-child talk, with increased screen time leading to significant reductions in adult words, child vocalizations, and conversational turns, especially notable at 36 months.

Read the complete article here.

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The Combined Contributions of Newborn Stress and Parenting Stress on Toddler Language Development

This study investigated the relationship between newborn neurobehavioral stress signs, maternal parenting stress, and toddler language development in 202 mother-infant dyads. The results showed that newborns with higher stress signs had fewer social-communicative gestures at 18 months, and those whose mothers experienced low parenting stress had a negative association with receptive vocabulary, highlighting the need for additional support for neonates with increased stress signs to mitigate language difficulties.

Read the complete article here.

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A Two-Generation, Early Childhood Advanced Primary Care Model

Reach Out and Read is an important component of 3-2-1 IMPACT described here, “A Two-Generation, Early Childhood Advanced Primary Care Model.” The model has been piloted in three different clinics in the public hospital system, New York Health and Hospitals (including the clinic at Bellevue where I work). The lead author, Dr. Mary McCord, is the Director of Pediatrics at Gotham Health and Sydenham Health Centers. “We all know that the impact of Reach Out and Read is good and real, because research has proven it and it’s a time that has a long-time impact,” she told me. “We need to integrate ROR into a multipronged approach for early childhood support and additive effect.”

The approach combines ROR and the Video Intervention Project with women’s health, Healthy Steps, child life, and community health workers. My colleague, Dr. Suzy Tomopoulos — Medical Director of Pediatric Ambulatory Care at Bellevue Hospital, and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at NYU, who is one of the authors — described the model as focusing on the first five years of life, with 0 to 3 the priority. ROR and VIP are provided to all families, and other services are tiered, based on maternal risk. There is screening for maternal depression, and screening for developmental milestones as well as for social emotional and behavioral milestones.

During the pilot, Dr. Tomopoulos said, “We cared for a lot of high-risk patients.” The pilot showed, she said, “we are able to implement an advanced primary care model to enhance long-term outcomes for children and parents.” She pointed in particular to the stigma attached to mental health issues, which can interfere with mothers getting help when they need it, and the importance of offering that care in the setting of the primary care clinic.

The next step is scaling up — and finding ways to approach payers and show that this can help hit benchmarks, “to enhance outcomes and get more dollars for preventive services in the first three years of life,” Dr. Tomopoulos said. “I think we need to be ambitious and think like that, how can we make pediatric primary care have a real impact, and how can we get the world of value-based care and population health and advanced primary care to recognize the importance,” Dr. McCord said. “We need to make the focus of primary care in the early years improving the social emotional outcomes of children.”

Read the complete article here.

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Infant‐directed communication: Examining the many dimensions of everyday caregiver‐infant interactions
YouTube’s ABCs and 123s: Describing the quality of early literacy and math videos on YouTube
Physicians’ lifelong learning journeys: A narrative analysis of continuing professional development struggles
Screen Time and Parent-Child Talk When Children Are Aged 12 to 36 Months
The Combined Contributions of Newborn Stress and Parenting Stress on Toddler Language Development
A Two-Generation, Early Childhood Advanced Primary Care Model